FOREIGN POLICY MARCH/APRIL 2004

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 24, 2004
Washington, DC

Contact: Nick Cosky
Tel: 202-939-2367
ncosky@ceip.org

FOREIGN POLICY March/April 2004
SAMUEL HUNTINGTON: HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS THREATEN THE AMERICAN WAY OF LIFE
Plus, the 4th Annual A.T. Kearney/FOREIGN POLICY Globalization Index, Bushs Spending Spree, Bridging the Information Divide, Free Trade Policy for Democrats, Walter Russell Mead on Americas Sticky Power, and More

A persistent inflow of Hispanic immigrants into the United States threatens to divide America into two peoples, two cultures, and two languages, argues Samuel Huntington, chairman of the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, cofounder of FOREIGN POLICY, and author of the infamous Clash of Civilizations. In an exclusive cover story in FPs March/April issue, Huntington explains that, unlike past immigrant groups, Mexicans and other Latinos have not assimilated into mainstream American culture. Instead, they form their own political and linguistic enclavesfrom Los Angeles to Miamiand challenge the Anglo-Protestant values that built the American dream. There is no Americano dream, Huntington concludes. There is only the American dream created by an Anglo-Protestant society. Mexican Americans will share in that dream and in that society only if they dream in English.

Excerpts from Huntingtons exclusive cover story:

In this new era, the single most immediate and most serious challenge to Americas traditional identity comes from the immense and continuing immigration from Latin America, especially from Mexico.

The cultural division between Hispanics and Anglos could replace the racial division between blacks and whites as the most serious cleavage in U.S. society.

The transformation of the United States into a [culturally bifurcated] countrywould not necessarily be the end of the world; it would, however, be the end of the America we have known for more than three centuries. Americans should not let that change happen unless they are convinced that this new nation would be a better one.

If the spread of Spanish as the United States second language continues English speakers lacking fluency in Spanish are likely to be and feel at a disadvantage in the competition for jobs, promotions, and contracts. (The Hispanic Challenge, p. 30)

THE FOURTH ANNUAL A.T. KEARNEY/FOREIGN POLICY GLOBALIZATION INDEX
For the third year in a row, Ireland ranks as the most global nation in the A.T. Kearney/FOREIGN POLICY Globalization Index. Western Europe claimed 6 out of the top 10 spots, and the United States broke into the top 10 for the first time. This years index revealed that even as the world economy slowed, Internet growth in poor countries and increased cross-border travel deepened global links.

The Globalization Index ranks 62 countries, which account for 84 percent of the worlds population, on 14 variables measuring economic integration, personal contact, technological connectivity, and political engagement. The 2004 Globalization Index also examines how women fare in globalized countries, the impact of globalization on religion, and the correlation between globalization and life expectancy. (Measuring Globalization: Economic Reversals, Forward Momentum, p. 54)

BUSHS PREELECTION SPENDING SPREE
Any alert voter can see that U.S. President George W. Bush is engineering a remarkable election-time economic boom. But before high-minded economists and commentators cry foul, just how excessive is the Bush business cycle? Kenneth Rogoff, professor of economics at Harvard University, tells us how Bushs preelection spending binge stacks up against his predecessors and the world. (Bush Throws a Party, p. 80)

BROADBAND MARXISM
Politicians and economists in developing countries searching for new technologies to create jobs and spur economic growth need look no further than their desks. The most vital technology for sparking development is a familiar and unglamorous one: the telephone. And the first step to bridging the digital divide is rolling back the privatization of telecommunications in developing nations. (p. 82)

HOW TO BE A FREE TRADE DEMOCRAT
The Democratic presidential nominee must break the ideological gridlock over globalization and show how smart, open trade policy can boost economic growth while protecting workers in the United States and around the world. Gene Sperling, former U.S. President Bill Clintons national economic advisor, explains how in this issues Memo to the PresidentAdvice for Global Leaders addressed to the U.S. Democratic Partys presidential nominee. (p. 70)

BETWEEN HARD AND SOFT, THERES STICKY POWER
U.S. military force and cultural appeal have kept the United States at the top of the global order. But hegemonies cannot live on guns and Hollywood alone. U.S. economic policies and institutions act as sticky power, attracting other countries to the U.S. system and then trapping them in it. Walter Russell Mead of the Council on Foreign Relations outlines how sticky power can help stabilize Iraq, bring rule of law to Russia, and even prevent armed conflict between the United States and China. (Americas Sticky Power, p. 46)

About FOREIGN POLICY

Founded in 1970, FOREIGN POLICY is the premier, award-winning magazine of global politics, economics, and ideas. Our readers include some of the most influential leaders in business, government, and other professional arenas in the United States and more than 90 other countries. In addition to our flagship English-language edition and Web site, www.foreignpolicy.com, FP is published in Arabic, Greek, Italian, Spanish (three editions), and Turkish. FP is published by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (www.ceip.org) in Washington, D.C. For syndication permission, contact Ayari de laRosa at 202-939-2241 or adelarosa@ceip.org.