South Asia

David Rothkopf

Lessons Learned (and Not)

Seven things we've learned after a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan.

David Rothkopf |

Terms of Engagement

A Country Unto Itself

There’s no place like India. Which is precisely why its politics and economy are such a contradictory, beautiful mess.

James Traub |

Terms of Engagement

Return of the Gandhis

In the new India, everything is moving a mile a minute. Except politics.

James Traub |

Slide Show

Forget the Flowers and Candy

Images from the women's rights rallies that have been taking place around the world this week.

Neha Paliwal |

Argument

Westward Ho!

As America pivots east, China marches in the other direction.

Yun Sun |

Dispatch

Love Is a Battlefield

Are the Taliban using sex to fight America?

Mujib Mashal |

Argument

We Shall Return

Don't be too sure there won't be another U.S. war in the Middle East.

Richard L. Russell |

David Rothkopf

Size Matters

The miniaturization of U.S. foreign policy.

David Rothkopf |

Argument

Why Is the United States Subsidizing Iran?

It's a veritable international mystery: How did Washington end up funding its adversaries in Tehran?

Frederick Starr |

Argument

Not Just Another Movie

Zero Dark Thirty lies. End of story.

Amy Zegart |

Argument

Sometimes They Come Back

How this zombie game explains our failure in Afghanistan.

Michael Peck |

Argument

The Silence in Delhi

The trial of India's vicious gang-rapists is under way, but don't think for a second the government is really committed to reform of women's rights.

Miranda Kennedy |

Argument

India's Missing Ingredients

Indian growth is slowing. But there are two key reforms that will help.

Hemal Shah |

Argument

Seizing the Moment

The world’s leading nations are convening a meeting on the fight against corruption. Here’s what they ought to be discussing.

Laurence Cockcroft |

Investigation

Mutiny in Kabul

An exclusive report on the troubled security team at America's most important embassy.

Adam Zagorin |

Terms of Engagement

Exit, Minus Strategy

Barack Obama has clearly decided to cut his losses in Afghanistan. Will all hell break lose when he does?

James Traub |

The List

Why the U.S. Can't Abandon Afghanistan

These five principles should guide the U.S.-Afghan relationship after 2014.

Davood Moradian |

Argument

The 5 Most Important Questions About Afghanistan

Obama can't shirk the difficult issues when he meets with Karzai this week.

Michael Kugelman |

Argument

Can India Defeat Poverty?

A bold new program may show the world the way.

Amanda Glassman |

David Barno

A 'Zero Option' for Afghanistan

Yes, President Karzai, we might pull out completely.

David W. Barno |

Argument

For Shame

Wait, Pakistan is blasting India for treating women badly?

Rashmee Roshan Lall |

Review

Gorging on Investment, Choking on Red Tape

Academic economists usually air their new ideas first in working papers. Here, before the work gets dusty, a quick look at transition policy research in progress.

Peter Passell |

Slide Show

Sign Language

The brutal gang rape of a 23-year-old student on a New Delhi bus in December has resulted in swift charges against five men and angry protests across the country. Want a sense of just how outraged people are? Look no further than the signs they're waving at demonstrations.

Slide Show |

The List

Four Surprises That Could Rock Asia in 2013

Are we paying attention to the wrong crises?

Michael Mazza |

Special Report

Stowaway

A reporter travels the treacherous Pakistan-Afghanistan border by truck.

Matthieu Aikins |

Dispatch

Rough Cut

Nearly all the world's diamonds -- legal or not -- pass through this one Indian city.

Jason Miklian |

Photo Essay

My Enemy, Myself

Who's your enemy? Why fight? Over the course of three years, Belgian-Tunisian photojournalist Karim Ben Khelifa has traveled to both sides of the world's longest-simmering conflicts to ask these pointed questions. What he heard from combatants in the Gaza Strip, the disputed Kashmir region along the India-Pakistan border, and tribally divided South Sudan captures the futility of wars that never end -- and can't be won. Tragically, bitter rivals are often fighting for the very same reasons.

Karim Ben Khelifa |