In Other Words

In Other Words

What They're Reading: A Greek Revival

The owner of a 108-year-old, family bookstore in Athens, Sofia Eleftheroudakis is a keeper of the Greek culture and character. In a conversation with FP, she discussed the comeback of the classics, the country's broken school system, and how the weather affects Europe's reading habits.

Brad Amburn |

In Other Words

What They're Reading: Picking up the Pages in Cambodia

Thirty years after the Khmer Rouge decimated Cambodia's intellectual and educated classes, a literary renaissance is beginning to take hold. FP spoke to novelist Pal Vannarirak, vice president of the Khmer Writers' Association, for her take on the country's return to literature.

Katherine Yester |

In Other Words

What They're Reading: Sweden's North Country Fare

Sweden is famous for its liberal ideas, its efficient social model, and a standard of living that rivals any other. But a rich literary tradition? FP talked with Svante Weyler, former publishing director of one of Sweden’s oldest publishing houses, Norstedts, for his take on the books that enlighten and entertain the Swedes.

Brad Amburn |

In Other Words

Turning a New Page in South Africa

South Africans have always turned to literature to wrestle with their country's challenges, be it apartheid, violent crime, or the AIDS epidemic. FP recently asked Shaun de Waal, arts and literary critic for Johannesburg's Mail & Guardian newspaper, how a new generation of writers is channeling the past to confront the present.

Katherine Yester |

In Other Words

Santiago's Poetry in Motion

From Isabel Allende to Pablo Neruda, Chile has long been a literary leader in Latin America. FP recently asked Verónica Cortínez, professor of Latin American literature, about the works that are inspiring a new generation of Chilean readers and writers.

Ben Fryer |

In Other Words

Who Killed Iraq?

After the invasion, America was supposed to help Iraq become a model democracy. Instead, the arrogance of L. Paul Bremer and his team of naïve neocons only helped Iraq become the world's most dangerous nation. This is how it all went wrong -- before it ever had a chance to go right.

Rajiv Chandrasekaran |

In Other Words

What They're Reading: Living in the Land of the Book

Despite living in a constant state of war, Israelis have always found time for books. FP spoke with David Ehrlich, owner of Jerusalem's Tmol Shilshom bookstore and cafe, and found, perhaps unsurprisingly, that themes of political and religious identity run deep in Israeli literature.

Christine Y. Chen |