Human Rights

COLUMN

If You Want Peace, You Have to Plan for It

How the world is training the next generation of peacebuilders.

Kristin Lord |

Argument

History Is So Not Over

It's time for a dose of realism when we think about how to build new democracies.

Alina Rocha Menocal |

Christian Caryl

Scotland's Tricky Choice

Self-determination doesn't necessarily mean freedom. Can an independent Scotland achieve both?

Christian Caryl |

Putinology

The Ghosts of Beslan

Why the memory of a mass hostage-taking -- and the botched rescue attempt that followed -- continues to haunt Russia.

Anna Nemtsova |

Argument

This Isn't the Time to Go Wobbly on Slavery

The U.K. government has made a good start on its war on slavery. But it needs to get serious.

Michael Pollitt |

Christian Caryl

License to Kill

Never underestimate the power of rage.

Christian Caryl |

Dispatch

'If You Take Away Land, You Take Away Life'

Cambodia's prime minister made a promise to tackle the country's most nagging social problem. Now his compatriots are taking him at his word.

Christina Larson |

Tea Leaf Nation

Gay Marriage Isn't Legal in China -- but a British Diplomat Did it Anyway

The recent Beijing nuptials of Brian Davidson are the talk of Weibo.

Alexa Olesen |

Argument

Maryam al-Khawaja, the Inconvenient Activist

The arrest of Bahraini human rights activist Maryam al-Khawaja marks a new low point for the country’s autocracy.

Samia Errazzouki |

Tea Leaf Nation

Mahmud -- Not Just Another Mainland Tourist in Hong Kong

A Uighur jade trader gets a rare chance to visit Hong Kong and has a taste of the freedom he does not enjoy back home.

Jun Mai |

Dispatch

How Not to End a Plague

From thuggish quarantines to botched burials, is the Liberian government’s handling of the Ebola crisis making it worse?

Clair MacDougall |

Argument

What Would the Soviets Say About Michael Brown?

From Birmingham to Ferguson, a brief history of how racial tensions at home have undermined America abroad.

Carol Anderson |

COLUMN

Would American Money Have Saved James Foley?

European governments pay millions of dollars in ransoms to free their hostages. The White House needs to decide whether it’s willing to sacrifice principle for people.

James Traub |

Dispatch

Exploited in the Southern Sun

After fleeing their homes and surviving a perilous Mediterranean crossing, African migrants in Italy are falling prey to labor gangs.

Maxim Tucker |

Argument

My Life Under House Arrest

One of China's best-known dissidents writes about life as a prisoner of conscience in Beijing.

Hu Jia |

Photo Essay

On the Other Side of the Mountain

A Yazidi family, safe for now, takes temporary shelter in Northern Iraq along the border with Syria.

Andrew Quilty |

COLUMN

All Heat and No Fire

The U.N. is going to determine if Hamas and Israel committed war crimes in Gaza. Even if they did, what can the U.N. do about it?

David Bosco |

Argument

Mayhem at the Hay Adams

Security teams for two African leaders cracked skulls -- literally -- at the White House's big leadership summit. That should never be allowed to happen again.

Jeffrey Smith |

Dispatch

'A Reckoning Hasn't Happened'

A new tribunal might prosecute some of Kosovo’s top leaders for gruesome crimes allegedly committed in the late 1990s, including organ trafficking and murder. But could it actually deliver justice?

Valerie Hopkins |

Dispatch

'Boys Will Be Boys'

In India's largest state, a misogynistic family-run political dynasty wants to pretend a rape epidemic doesn't exist.

Ankita Rao |

Lab Report

The Height of Hubris

Why an Erdogan victory in Turkey's presidential election is likely to trigger the biggest opposition backlash yet. The first in our series of Lab Reports on Turkey.

Cenk Sidar |

Slide Show

Stranded on Mount Sinjar

The Yazidis, a small Iraqi religious minority, are marooned and starving on a mountain in Kurdistan. Now, the United States is trying to save them from the murderous hands of the Islamic State.

FP Staff |

Argument

Is It Now Legal to Be Gay in Uganda?

The country's infamous anti-homosexuality law has been struck down -- but homophobia is still dangerously enshrined in the country's penal code.

Neela Ghoshal |

Tea Leaf Nation

In One Xinjiang City, Beards and Muslim Headscarves Banned From Buses

Karamay's clumsy policy is likely to fray nerves further in an already tense region.

Alexa Olesen |

Argument

The Power of Naming and Shaming

Why renaming a Washington street after a leading Chinese dissident is an excellent idea.

Pedro Pizano |

Dispatch

The Death of Sympathy

How Israel’s hawks intimidated and silenced the last remnants of the anti-war left.

Gregg Carlstrom |

Argument

Sending the Right Message

Why this week's U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit needs to pay more than just lip service to human rights and good governance.

Daniel Bekele |

Argument

Back to the Future in Libya

Why some Libyans see a solution to the country's political crises in a document that was published 63 years ago.

Lorianne Updike Toler |

Report

Negotiating the Next War

Allowing rebels to leverage a cease-fire into political power will only lead to more death in the Central African Republic -- as it has in South Sudan and too many other African states.

Rebecca Hamilton |

Dispatch

In Congo, a Disabled Peace

Security is improving in the eastern part of the country -- so why are many refugees worse off than before?

Ty McCormick |