Justice

Dispatch

Tired and Angry, Mexico’s Protests Show No Signs of Abating

The fury over the killing of 43 students in Ayotzinapa has galvanized the country, and highlighted the rift between old-school leftists and President Peña Nieto’s economic reforms.

Laura Carlsen |

Dispatch

Greece's Neo-Nazis Were Scarier Than Anyone Imagined

Prosecutors in the trials to disband Golden Dawn claim the group slaughtered sheep to practice knife techniques, carried around bazookas, and was training to “break into parliament with tanks.”

Yiannis Baboulias |

Argument

Lawyers, Guns, and Mujahideen

Inside Syria’s sharia court system.

Maxwell Martin |

Argument

The Myth of the Big Bad Lone Wolf

Trying to stop lone-wolf terrorists -- much less mentally ill murderers -- is a waste of law enforcement's time and money.

David Gomez |

Argument

Dark Sites and the Bill of Rights

When Uncle Sam projects his power abroad, does the Constitution tag along?

Joshua Fiveson |

COLUMN

How to Destroy the International Criminal Court From Within

Kenya's president is charged with inciting ethnic violence that killed thousands. He's about to talk his way out of it like it's a parking ticket.

David Bosco |

COLUMN

Pot, Meet Needle

Execution is as execution does.

Matt Bors |

Argument

Maryam al-Khawaja, the Inconvenient Activist

The arrest of Bahraini human rights activist Maryam al-Khawaja marks a new low point for the country’s autocracy.

Samia Errazzouki |

Argument

13 Years On, Will 9/11 Ever Go to Trial?

From spies in the defense team to secret kill switches in the courtroom, the list of government perversions of an already-broken trial system is making the quest for justice endless.

Laura Pitter |

Dispatch

The Intifada Comes to Brooklyn

Can 297 victims of Hamas terrorist attacks in the Second Intifada find justice in a New York court?

Batya Ungar-Sargon |

Dispatch

'A Reckoning Hasn't Happened'

A new tribunal might prosecute some of Kosovo’s top leaders for gruesome crimes allegedly committed in the late 1990s, including organ trafficking and murder. But could it actually deliver justice?

Valerie Hopkins |

Dispatch

'Around Here, People Love Him'

In the Cambodian province where Khmer Rouge leaders came to die, people aren’t celebrating a guilty verdict against two top regime officials. After all, they’re neighbors.

Joe Freeman |

Argument

Is It Now Legal to Be Gay in Uganda?

The country's infamous anti-homosexuality law has been struck down -- but homophobia is still dangerously enshrined in the country's penal code.

Neela Ghoshal |

Argument

Immunity Cannot Allow Impunity

African leaders want to exempt themselves from prosecution for terrible crimes -- but new research shows their people aren't as forgiving as they might think. 

Jon Temin |

Argument

The Rights Abuses Uruguay Doesn't Want You to Know About

A small South American country has been making big strides in human rights. But it's still got some work to do.

Debbie Sharnak |

Argument

Justice for MH17

The world wants to hold someone accountable for the 298 people killed. But determining whom to go after -- and how to hold them responsible -- won’t be easy.

Rebecca Hamilton |

Christian Caryl

The Woman Who Came Back from Hell

How Rwanda's Pentecostals are keeping the demons of the past at bay.

Christian Caryl |

Argument

Has Kenya Destroyed the ICC?

The body blows dealt by Nairobi have human rights groups questioning whether the court can -- or should -- prosecute atrocities in South Sudan and other African states.

Michela Wrong |

Argument

Build a Party, Beware of Judges, and Never Give Up

Lessons from a lifetime of political activism.

Mohamed Nasheed |

Argument

A Miscarriage of Justice in Cairo

The sentencing of three Al Jazeera journalists to lengthy prison terms on nonexistent evidence shows how paranoid and degraded the Egyptian regime has become.

Bel Trew |

Argument

The Two Faces of Ratko Mladic

How Serbia has become indifferent toward the man who lost the war, his honor, and his freedom. 

Slavenka Drakulić |

Lab Report

A Tale of Two Decrees

Tunisia's media sector still has a long way to go before it can serve as a bulwark of democracy. The third in our series of Lab Reports on Tunisia.

Fadil Aliriza |

Christian Caryl

Not So Happy In Iran

Iran’s ayatollahs are going nuts over a harmless video. But they’re not the first autocrats to obsess about the impact of popular culture.

Christian Caryl |

Lab Report

Embracing Enemies in Tunisia

Tunisia's main political forces have agreed on a deal to shore up the political middle and undermine extremists. That could be a crucial milestone on the path to democracy. The first in our series of Lab Reports on Tunisia.

Oussama Romdhani |

Exclusive

Exclusive: Inside the FBI's Fight Against Chinese Cyber-Espionage

An American solar panel company wondered why Chinese firms kept undercutting their prices. Then the FBI knocked on their door.

Shane Harris |

Argument

The Lost Girls

Why women are the "spoils of war" in Nigeria and around the world -- and nobody cares.

Lauren Wolfe |

Feature

For the Mothers of Tondo

Why the surprising Philippine Supreme Court ruling on reproductive health rights is a big win for women -- and a blow to the church.

Tom Hundley |

Dispatch

Confronting Ghosts

France convicts a Rwandan of genocide -- and grapples with its own role in the horrific events of 1994.

Anna Polonyi |

COLUMN

Return To Sender

Why Ukraine’s ousted president won’t be tried in The Hague.

David Bosco |

David Rothkopf

Course Correction

Dealing with dictators cost the U.S. its soul. Now it's time to atone.

David Rothkopf |