Law

Argument

13 Years On, Will 9/11 Ever Go to Trial?

From spies in the defense team to secret kill switches in the courtroom, the list of government perversions of an already-broken trial system is making the quest for justice endless.

Laura Pitter |

Report

Argentine Default Bad Test Case for Sovereign Debt Negotiations

Messy bondholder fight could complicate future defaults.

Jamila Trindle |

Lab Report

The Height of Hubris

Why an Erdogan victory in Turkey's presidential election is likely to trigger the biggest opposition backlash yet. The first in our series of Lab Reports on Turkey.

Cenk Sidar |

Dispatch

The Islamic State that Wasn't

Yemen's al Qaeda franchise isn't moving to create its own Islamic state quite yet. But the fact that it continues to thrive is ominous enough.

Peter Salisbury |

Dispatch

'Around Here, People Love Him'

In the Cambodian province where Khmer Rouge leaders came to die, people aren’t celebrating a guilty verdict against two top regime officials. After all, they’re neighbors.

Joe Freeman |

Argument

Africa's Free Trade Hangover

Why African leaders have growing doubts about the virtues of free trade.

Rick Rowden |

Argument

Saakashvili Doesn't Need a Little Help from His Friends

Georgia's ex-president stands accused of abusing his power. His friends in the West should let the law run its course.

Lincoln Mitchell |

Argument

Is It Now Legal to Be Gay in Uganda?

The country's infamous anti-homosexuality law has been struck down -- but homophobia is still dangerously enshrined in the country's penal code.

Neela Ghoshal |

Argument

A Short History of Vultures

Long before Argentina’s latest default, there was Elliott Associates L.P. v. Republic of Panama.

Saskia Sassen |

Argument

Back to the Future in Libya

Why some Libyans see a solution to the country's political crises in a document that was published 63 years ago.

Lorianne Updike Toler |

Report

Argentina Lets Default Clock Run Out

But even a default won't stop this soap opera.

Jamila Trindle |

Argument

The Rights Abuses Uruguay Doesn't Want You to Know About

A small South American country has been making big strides in human rights. But it's still got some work to do.

Debbie Sharnak |

Argument

Justice for MH17

The world wants to hold someone accountable for the 298 people killed. But determining whom to go after -- and how to hold them responsible -- won’t be easy.

Rebecca Hamilton |

Argument

How Many Lawyers Does It Take to Fight a War?

When the dust finally settles in Gaza, the battle will head to the courtroom.

Suzanne Nossel |

Argument

Are the Oceans Failed States?

Thanks to overfishing, pollution, climate change, and terrible governance, the largest ecosystem on the planet is close to collapse.

Richard Schiffman |

Tea Leaf Nation

Inside China's Blackest Box

Even high cadres quake at the term ‘shuanggui,’ an extra-judicial interrogation method that has claimed lives.

David Wertime |

Report

Record Fine for French Bank

U.S. uses dollar power to penalize BNP Paribas for violating sanctions.

Jamila Trindle |

Argument

It’s Okay to Have Mixed Feelings About Luis Suárez

Just like in politics and law, saying otherwise won’t do anyone any good.

Daniel Altman |

Argument

The Two Faces of Ratko Mladic

How Serbia has become indifferent toward the man who lost the war, his honor, and his freedom. 

Slavenka Drakulić |

Tea Leaf Nation

The President that China Never Had

Netizens are using a Korean film about late president Roh Moo-hyun as a subtle form of protest.

David Wertime |

ChinaFile

Pu Zhiqiang Speaks From Prison

My conversations with the imprisoned Chinese human rights defender.

Zhang Sizhi |

Argument

Colombia Calls a Draw in the War on Drugs

After years of bloodshed, Colombia's government is teaming up with its former rebel enemies to beat the drug problem.

Oliver Kaplan |

Lab Report

A Tale of Two Decrees

Tunisia's media sector still has a long way to go before it can serve as a bulwark of democracy. The third in our series of Lab Reports on Tunisia.

Fadil Aliriza |

Argument

Thailand Needs to Talk

The latest military coup in Thailand won't ensure real stability unless the country's new rulers address the deeper causes of political conflict.

Daniel Lansberg-Rodríguez |

Argument

The Lady Rallies the Masses Once Again

Aung San Suu Kyi wants to change the Burmese constitution. But will the military really go along?

Min Zin |

Report

U.S. Companies Still Puzzling Over North Korean Gold Question

After disclosing that they used the forbidden metal, some companies are still trying to figure out whether they did.

Jamila Trindle |

Lab Report

Embracing Enemies in Tunisia

Tunisia's main political forces have agreed on a deal to shore up the political middle and undermine extremists. That could be a crucial milestone on the path to democracy. The first in our series of Lab Reports on Tunisia.

Oussama Romdhani |

Report

Companies Disclose Use of Gold From North Korea

New rule forces businesses to trace their supply chains.

Jamila Trindle |

Argument

What Strongmen Have to Fear

Autocrats have increasing reason to fear the power of people in the streets. Here's why the leaders of democracies should take note.

Andrea Kendall-Taylor |

ChinaFile

Is Indicting Chinese Hackers a Smart Move or Dumb Strategy?

A conversation about responding to Chinese cyberespionage. 

Robert Daly |