Politics

Slide Show

The World This Week in Photos

U.S. Marines pack up in Afghanistan; Hungarians protest a proposed Internet tax; and a nude swimming competition in France.

FP Staff |

Christian Caryl

The Beacon Dims

The United States wants to spread democratic values around the world. It can start by cleaning up its own act at home.

Christian Caryl |

Slide Show

Burkina Faso Burning

Protests in the capital, Ouagadougou, are spinning out of control.

FP Staff |

Argument

West Africa's Financial Immune Deficiency

Health systems in Africa are ill-equipped to deal with Ebola. And that's partly the fault of IMF policies.

Rick Rowden |

Tea Leaf Nation

Foot Spas, Steamed Buns, and Midday Drinking

Chinese bureaucracy has run amok, and the country's president is trying to rein it in.

Shujie Leng |

Dispatch

Ukraine Wins

A successful parliamentary election opens a window of hope for an embattled country.

James Kirchick |

Argument

Stop Playing Cowboy on Ebola

By defying the CDC, U.S. governors imposing unnecessary Ebola quarantines risk making the next global pandemic all the more terrifying.

Gregg Gonsalves |

COLUMN

The Dark Side of Dilma

Why Brazil's election result is nothing but trouble.

Daniel Altman |

Slide Show

The World This Week in Photos

A wedding portrait at Hong Kong's protests; gas masks at Indonesia's presidential inauguration; and sunlight in an Egyptian temple.

FP Staff |

Argument

Chasing Away the Democracy Blues

Why democracy is worth fighting for -- now more than ever.

Larry Diamond |

Tea Leaf Nation

In China, Law Isn't Winning

Why more Chinese don't believe in the corruption crackdown.

Yeliang Xia |

Argument

Stan'd if You Do, Stan'd if You Don't

Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan want to drop the pesky Persian suffix that’s been frustrating Central Asia for generations. Here’s why that’s a bad idea.

Ted Trautman |

Christian Caryl

Sorry, Eric X. Li, Democracy Is Not the Problem

Hong Kong's pro-democracy activists aren't radicals or revolutionaries. But that's what Beijing wants you to believe.

Christian Caryl |

COLUMN

We Have Reached Peak President

Why the time of great American leadership is over.

Aaron David Miller |

COLUMN

How to Squander Home-Field Advantage

Surely, the administration should realize that lecturing friends and browbeating allies doesn't do it many favors.

Kori Schake |

Dispatch

The Bumbling Bigots of Budapest

A would-be white nationalist conference in Hungary ends with confusion, chicken paprikash, and not much else.

Paul Brian |

Dispatch

Who's Running This Joint, Anyway?

Two governments are competing to rule Libya -- but it may be the militias that wield the real power.

Mary Fitzgerald |

Dispatch

Vlad Is Rad

Meet the hipster wing of Putin’s propaganda machine.

Alec Luhn |

Lab Report

How to Bring Brazil's Economy Back to Life

The policies that helped Brazil to healthy growth over the past decade have lost momentum. The next president will need bold new ideas that look beyond the short term. Third in our series of Lab Reports on Brazil.

Rob Dwyer |

Dispatch

What's Stopping Turkey From Saving Kobani?

Ankara can't seem to make up its mind about who's the bigger enemy: the Islamic State or the Kurds.

David Kenner |

Dispatch

From Outcasts to Kingmakers

The improbable tale of how the Houthis seized control of Yemen's revolution.

Peter Salisbury |

Dispatch

The Umbrella Movement Playlist

Stirring, profane, always authentic: Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests have developed a rich musical culture.

Doug Meigs |

Dispatch

Thug Politics, Kiev

Oleh Lyashko gets into fist fights, kidnaps rebels, and supplies militias (or so he claims). Meet the radical populist who could play kingmaker in post-Maidan Ukraine.

Charles McPhedran |

Report

Every Time She Thinks She's Out, They Pull Her Back In

Leon Panetta's new book is yanking Hillary Clinton into a debate she doesn't want to have: whether Obama lost Iraq.

Gopal Ratnam |

Argument

Hong Kong Pride

Hong Kong’s pro-democracy protest isn’t only about freedom. It’s also about identity.

Peter Rutland |

COLUMN

Competence Not Required

Julia Pierson’s ouster is the exception that proves the rule: In Washington it is nearly impossible to get fired.

Stephen M. Walt |

Lab Report

The Subtle Art of the Brazilian Majority

Brazilians want change. But they'll only get it if their new president can combine the urge to reform with the will to govern. The second in our series of Lab Reports on Brazil.

Gregory Michener |

Argument

Notes on a Turkish Conspiracy

How the looming end of a 100-year-old treaty exposes the existential paranoia at the heart of Erdogan’s foreign policy.

Nicholas Danforth |