Special Report

The Power Issue

This special Power Issue of Foreign Policy gets right to the point: Who has it and what do they do with it? Our report covers power in many forms, with original reporting, exclusive interviews, and more than a few fascinating characters from China to Russia, India to the Middle East -- plus an exclusive Power Map of the planet's 500 most powerful people, from billionaires to bad guys, CEOs to central bankers. We're calling it "The 0.000007 Percent."

Our five profiles in power run the gamut from a brand-wielding chief executive to an aircraft-carrier-wielding party leader. From Beijing, John Garnaut goes behind the scenes of Xi Jinping's accession and shows how China's new president is playing the dangerous game of using the military as his secret political weapon. Mark Perry, meanwhile, unravels the Hollywood-worthy story of the shadowy life and mysterious death of Imad Mughniyeh, the world's most famous terrorist not named Osama bin Laden until his assassination several years ago. Ian Bremmer interviews Coca-Cola CEO Muhtar Kent for an entirely different take on soft (drink) power, and James Traub returns to India for a memorable portrait of Rahul Gandhi, the ambivalent heir apparent to the world's largest democracy. FP Editor in Chief Susan Glasser travels to Moscow to report on the relentless Sergei Lavrov and the blunt logic of Russian power. This issue marks Foreign Policy's 200th edition, and we couldn't think of a more fitting subject to mark the occasion.

 

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Special Report

The Iraq War Diaries

When the first tanks crossed over the Kuwait border headed to Baghdad in March 2003, Marine platoon commander Timothy McLaughlin was among those leading the charge. His battalion thundered across the desert taking fire, and returned a lot more. Days later, they reached the Iraqi capital, and after bloody fighting found themselves surrounded by a small crowd of cheering Iraqis in Firdos Square. There, in a moment watched on television by hundreds of millions of people around the world, his battalion toppled the towering statue of Saddam Hussein. In fact, it was McLaughlin's own American flag that was draped over the statue's face before it fell -- an iconic image of victory that belied the long war to come.

Throughout his deployment, McLaughlin kept a personal diary of his experiences, sometimes recounting battles blow-by-blow and, in quieter moments, composing poetry or songs. There's a kill list of enemies felled; a catalog of the "people I saw," like the "white haired gentleman at the Palestine Hotel who said ‘thank you for all of Iraq’"; a letter to a Victoria's Secret model written in Kuwait as he awaited the start of the war; and a minute-by-minute account of his experience at the Pentagon on the morning of 9/11, as he raced toward the burning building.

When McLaughlin left the Marine Corps, he packed away his diary and that iconic flag. He moved on, struggled with PTSD, went to law school. The journal sat in a chest, unread, until the journalist Peter Maass, who had followed McLaughlin's battalion into Baghdad, visited him in 2010 while reporting an article for the New Yorker. Maass knew immediately what a remarkable document he had found. With the help of award-winning photographer Gary Knight, who also followed McLaughlin’s battalion during the invasion of Baghdad, they have created a vivid account of the early days of the Iraq War -- a unique and personal history of a defining chapter in America’s fraught adventure in the Middle East.

Ten years after American troops went into battle, Foreign Policy is pleased to present The Iraq War Diaries: a multimedia microsite featuring McLaughlin's gripping journal pages and combat snapshots -- accompanied by Knight’s powerful photographs, Maass’s seminal articles about the invasion, and videos of McLaughlin reading aloud his personal account of war.

"Invasion: Diaries and Memories of War in Iraq" will be showing at the Bronx Documentary Center in New York from March 14 to April 19.

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The Inside Story of the Diary

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'His Horse Was Named Death'
The Iraq War Diaries of Tim McLaughlin.

His Horse Was Named Death

Inside the Pentagon on 9/11
McLaughlin's minute-by-minute account of the terrorist attack in Washington.

Inside the Pentagon on 9/11

Assault on Baghdad
'Completely destroy everything on the other side of the canal.'

Assault on Baghdad

Tearing Down Saddam
'This place is pandemonium.'

Tearing Down Saddam

Kill Lists and Victoria's Secret
A Marine's candid, and often funny, reflections on life during wartime.

Kill Lists and Victoria's Secret

The Invasion Timeline
The march from Kuwait to the heart of Baghdad.

The Invasion Timeline